• Lighting India
  • Jun 27, 2018

Moshe Kimchi enjoys Halo RGB and MegaPointe

Moshe Kimchi is an Israeli lighting designer whose company, Moshe Kimchi Lighting Design, based in Jerusalem, has recently invested in Robe technology, with an initial purchase of 60 x Halo RGB LED rings, quickly followed by 18 x MegaPointes.



 Moshe Kimchi is an Israeli lighting designer whose company, Moshe Kimchi Lighting Design, based in Jerusalem, has recently invested in Robe technology, with an initial purchase of 60 x Halo RGB LED rings, quickly followed by 18 x MegaPointes.

  As most of Moshe Kimchi’s work also includes designing the project as well as supplying the lighting kit, he has a slightly different take on projects than companies more focused on purely rental operations. As such, he’s always looking out for new, interesting and different lighting concepts and effects which will enhance his creativity and enable him to deliver fresh and different looking shows. This is what attracted him to the Halo RGB!

  The fixture is a circle of encapsulated bright micro-pixel LEDs which can be DMX controlled or fed with video sources and used to produce ephemeral and magical effects. It can fit on the end of a standard PAR 64 can, giving the legendary rock ‘n’ roll fixture a new contemporary lease of life or be used as a stand-alone effect.

  Moshe first saw the Halo RGB product video, realised the great potential of this fixture for his work – which includes corporates, music shows and dance events – and made the purchase via Robe’s Israeli distributor, Danor Theatre and Studio Systems.

  He used them for his “Journey into Space” installation at the 2017 Festival of Light in Jerusalem where he was one of the contributing artists. He also used them to help light a large sculptural, illuminated menorah (nine-branched candelabrum) built at the Jerusalem municipality square for the Hanukkah holiday.

  At a recent Independence Day dance party in Tel Aviv’s Hangar 11 venue, he used both sets of fixtures. The Halo RGBs were rigged on a structure behind the DJ booth in a 6 high x 10 wide matrix which looked highly effective as a backdrop and offered something different from an in-the-face HD LED screen. “I wanted an LED and a digital element that was dynamic, kinetic and more off-beat,” explained Moshe, “And this arrangement of the Halo RGBs worked perfectly! I like adding a bit of mystery to the equation!”

Photos: Louise Stickland